Monday, 25 October 2021

Halloween Sequencing Activities

Halloween Sequencing Puzzles

These are many Halloween Sequencing Activities that are created in the form of flashcards, digital sorting activities, and puzzles. I created twelve sequencing events that your students can do in batches or as a whole with all twelve sequences. Each sequencing item has 3-step sequences. Some of the activities are based on common Halloween traditions, like carving a pumpkin, whereas others are based on fictional characters, such as Vampires and Witches. 

The picture above shows the Halloween Sequence Puzzles and sorting mat worksheets. It's a PDF which includes 12 puzzles and three sorting mats for the puzzles. The sorting mats have a worksheet section for students to write the order of the sequencing steps (see the picture below). Click on any of the activites here to see a detailed listing of each of the twelve sequences.



Halloween Sequencing Flashcards with an Easel Activity: This is a PDF download of 12 sequences both in color and black and white. Students will have fun matching up the three steps. Each sequence is all about a different Halloween situation and will be shown on three cards to show step 1, 2, and 3.


Halloween Themed Interactive Sequencing Activity for Boom Learning℠: This one is perfect for distance learning and you can assign Boom decks with Google Classroom™. It is 12 sets of self-grading Boom Cards™ for students to order pictures of Halloween sequences that are randomly shown at different stages of completion. They are hosted on the Boom Learning℠ platform.

See my collection of Halloween themed sequencing activities here from my TpT collection. You get to download them instantly upon purchase and they can be used for years because you'll have lifetime access to the files. 

Thursday, 14 October 2021

Classroom Binder storage Ideas

Teachers use binders for subject notes, school forms, lesson plans, and student records. You can never have too many binders in your classroom. Binders can fall over, especially if they are only half full of pages. It reminds me of toppling dominoes. I'm sure you have experienced pulling out one binder from your shelf and the others lean in.  All of the following ideas can help to keep your binders upright, even if you pull out one from the line up. They will keep the space with placeholders for when you return the binder in its place.

I love to find awesome classroom storage ideas. As an Amazon affiliate, I may earn a commission for purchases using my links. Learn more. The ideas and paid links below are based on Amazon finds that are great for keeping classroom binders upright.

How to Keep Binders Upright

  • Keep binders in a bakeware sorting rack: This teacher keeps her binders in wire racks (#ad). Each slot holds two 1" binders. The racks are made of steel and each one has nine compartment spaces.

  • Use a free standing wire rod magazine rackThis wood base rack (#ad) can hold five binders and keep them upright. When it is full, it seems invisible because all you will see is just the neat binders.


 
  • Get stylish with classy wire racks for binders: This brass stand (#ad) has eight slots. That's the benefit of wire racks. They tend to have more slots. It also comes in black.

 
  • Use collapsible binder holders: Did you know that there are collapsible binder holders? Each compartment can be shrunk if you you not need it. Just press two panels together to shrink, and pull them apart to expand.

  • Get binder holders with wide compartments are large 3" binders: If you have large binders, then you'll need wider slot spaces to fit them. These binder holders have 3" compartments for the wide binders. They are available in two sizes: three compartments and four compartments.

If you are looking for a new teacher planner template, I have a black and white one and colorful one in my TpT collection. See them here. They are updated for you each year.

More ideas will be added soon.

Thursday, 30 September 2021

Classroom Book Bins Aren't Just for Books

What can you use book bins for

Book bins make any collection of books or other classroom essentials have neat storage with easy access. The open tops are convenient for students to just reach in, to take out, or return an item. There are no clips or latches to open. The sides are deep enough to keep items within the bins and since book bins are usually placed tightly in a row, it reduces the chamces of them getting knocked over. 

I'm noticing that book bins are not only being used for storing classroom library books, but they are being used for storing many other classrom items like Chromebooks, clipboards, earphones, worksheets, and centers. The ideas and paid links below are based on Amazon finds that show the versatility of book bins in the classroom. As an Amazon affiliate, I may earn a commission for purchases using my links. Learn more.

  • Store classroom laptops in book bins: 

  • Store classroom earphones in book bins: This classroom cubby shelf is for students' books and earphones. The earphones go in the book bins to keep them safe.

  • Use book bins as student mailboxes: Put all work that is to be sent home in book bins that are labelled with students' names. They can also be used as turn in bins. The storage rack keeps the bins secure.

 
  • Store classroom manipulatives in book bins: Put your math maipulatives in zippy bags, then store each one in a book bin. This keeps the bags separate and makes everything neat.

  • Use book bins as turn in bins: If you have a lot of subject areas to collect work for and less space to store it all, use book bins to collect the work. A book bin rack would be necessary to keep the book bins upright.

You can find lots of free book bin labels here for your classroom. There are black and white templates and colorful ones. Some of the labels are PDFs and others are editable in PowerPoint. More ideas will be added soon.

Thursday, 16 September 2021

How to Store Students' Phones in the Classroom


How can you store students' cell phones in the classroom? With the right storage idea, it is easy to keep classroom phones stored away in an organized storage system. Examples of these are phone sorter boxes, phone storage pocket charts, small drawer storage units, phone charging stands, and wall mounted storage racks. Most classroom teachers use the pocket charts to store cell phones, but the phone sorter boxes are becoming popular. Both options have ease of access for the students.

Safety and accessibility are important factors to consider for choosing the right place in the classroom to store cell phones. The teacher should have free access to the storage area. The students, depending in the class level, can have limited access. The phones can be in a locked system to keep them secure, or the teacher can keep them in a restricted access area or close to the teacher desk. Every classroom storage system for phones must have a number system for organizing the phones.

I love to find awesome classroom decor ideas. As an Amazon affiliate, I may earn a commission for purchases using my links. Learn more. The ideas and paid links below are based on Amazon finds that are great for storing students' phones in the classroom.

Types of classroom storage systems for student cell phones:

 
  • Use a phone sorter box: This is a good storage idea for teacher to keep students' cell phones sorted. It doubles as a charging station. 


  • Use a hanging paper sorter: This wall hanging paper sorter holds the chargers on the bottom rack and the phones go in the other racks. It can hold six phones. 


  • Hang a wall mounted phone charging station: This charging station is lockable, and it has padded slots. You can put laminated numbered cards in corresponding slots for students to take a card as their “claim ticket”.


  • Store phones in a pocket chart: Pocket charts for phones can be labelled with a number system for organizing all of the students' cell phones.


  • Make your own stackable storage units: These IRIS drawers are small, but perfect storing cell phones. The stackable drawers can stay on your teacher desk or go on a bookshelf.


  • Use a charger stand for multiple phones: Have a few charger stations set up in your classroom. Each station will have a charger stand for designated phones to be stored there.

More cell phone storage ideas will be added soon. If you need tips for storing other technology devices, like classroom laptops and tablets, I have put together different storage and organization ideas in this blog post.

Thursday, 9 September 2021

DIY Zip Tie Projects for Classrooms


Every teacher needs to keep zip ties on hand for DIY classroom organization. They are used for organizing wires and cables, but also for tying shelving, furniture, and carts.  You can use the super strong zip ties which permanently lock into place for heavy duty bundling of cables, or for securing different classroom items together without having to use a drill or nail gun. There are different types of materials like zip ties that for classroom use. The fabric ones with Velcro, and the rubber ones with magnetic clasps are easy to open and close if you need to reuse them.

I love to find awesome classroom DIY ideas. As an Amazon affiliate, I may earn a commission for purchases using my links. Learn more. The ideas and paid links below are based on Amazon finds that are easy classroom DIY projects.

  • Make adjustable shelves: Use modular wire grid shelving and some zip ties to create your unique shelf for storing your construction paper or cardstock.

  • Secure your charging rack to your docking system: For DIY device charging carts or racks, use zip ties to secure your tablet or laptop storage racks above your charging hub. They can both be zip tied to a wire shelf, peg board, taple top organizer, etc. 


  • For classroom safety: Using zip ties help prevent students from accidentally kicking, unplugging, or tripping on their cords.


  • To build classroom furniture: These milk crates were connected with matching white zip ties to create a classroom bookshelf.


  • Color code classroom cables:  Use assorted zip ties for cable management. This teacher uses them in several iPad carts. They do what they are supposed to do while looking cool with their different colors.


  • Emergency fixes: It is just a good idea to keep some tip ties around in case of a 'hardware' emergency. If something breaks apart or bends, it can be supported or fixed temporarily with zip ties and tape, until you can get it fixed.


  • DIY construction projects: It is amazing to see what teachers can create for their classrooms. A kitchen rack for pot lids is zip tied to a milk crate to make a charging station for laptops. Wow!


  • Temporary sorting: Use the Velcro ties or magnetic ties for temporary organizing or color coding of classroom chords. These ties are easy to unfasten so that you can reuse them for a new purpose.

More ideas will be added soon.

Thursday, 2 September 2021

Turn In Bins for Classrooms


Every classroom needs turn in stations for student work. Turn in bins are used for collecting homework, forms, assignments, and worksheets from your students. Each bin or paper tray needs to have a clear label for students to be able to use your turn-in system efficiently. There are many of ways to make a turn in work organizer for your classroom. Teachers use paper tray organizers, plastic bins, stackable baskets, drawer carts, book bins, and classroom mailboxes. See how teachers are using these to make student turn in bins and homework trays in the classroom pictures below. 

I love to find awesome classroom decor ideas. As an Amazon affiliate, I may earn a commission for purchases using my links. Learn more. The ideas and paid links below are based on Amazon finds that are great for making turn in bins for classrooms.


  • Use a wire mesh letter tray organizer: Always choose an organizer that has a stackable design for turn-in trays. I prefer the wire mesh ones because they are strong enough to hold heavy stacks of paper. If you are short on space, stack another tray on top for more tray space.


  • Use classroom mailboxes: Mailboxes come in different sizes and materials. I find that the wooden ones are the most durable. Use a different slot for each subject. I think that most teachers use the mailboxes for turn in bins because they have enough compartments for a high volume of worksheets. 


  • A drawer cart: Label a drawer cart with all the homework categories you need. Students can use it to turn in homework for each subject.
 
  • Plastic baskets: Plastic baskets and trays that are right size for holding stacks of letter sized sheets can be used for turn in bins. They can be assorted bright colors or all of the same color, to match your classroom decor. Just glue the labels on the front.


 
  • Plastic Drawers: These drawers are made to hold letter sized sheets of paper. They come with a pack of blank chalkboard label stickers. You can write your categories on them with a chalk marker. Think of them as a drawer system for turn in bins.



  • Mix and match combination: If you are short on space but you need a lot of turn-in categories, add extra drawers to what you already have. This teacher first had a Seville drawer cart for a turn in station. Then found that she needed more drawers so she added a three-drawer set onto what she had before. Both drawers are black and the matching labeling systems make them blend together.

  • Use book bins in a storage rack: Book bins make good turn in bins if you have a lot of subject areas to collect work for and less space to store it all. A book bin rack would be necessary to keep the book bins upright.

You can find lots of free turn in bin labels here for your classroom. There are black and white templates and colorful ones. Some of the labels are PDFs and others are editable in PowerPoint. More ideas will be added soon.

About Me

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As a Caribbean primary school teacher, I share my unique classroom with the world through this blog. Readers step into my class through the pictures, articles and classroom samples of games and lessons used in my class. I have been teaching since 2005 at the std. 4 primary level in Trinidad and Tobago. I am particularly interested in sharing my own personal lesson plans, tests and activities. Teachers need to share ideas and support each other because in doing so, we help to educate our students and develop ourselves as teachers. Technology is ever evolving and we as teachers should get on board with it, collaborate and keep up to date with this new age that we live in. Our students belong to this technological era and we must embrace opportunities to learn from each other in this global community. I also love to express my creativity in the classroom. I am a bit of a craftster . So I'm always cutting, gluing or making something... a game, a chart, a learning center, etc. So, teachers and parents, feel free to stop by and see what's new at Nyla's Crafty Teaching!